Drawing, painting and photographing fungi

 

 

 

Here's a special treat - well , two actually! In the first, the botanical artist Lorna Minton gives you a complete eight-part course on sketching and painting fungi, and in the second, wildlife photographer Gordon Dickson offers an eight-part master class in fungal photography (and a few other people help with advice on related topics).

 

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Classroom materials may be copied freely for educational purposes only. All rights reserved for commercial use. British Mycological Society 2006.

 

In this series of eight Mycologist articles, Lorna Minton shows you how to sketch and paint fungi.

Illustrating fungi part 1

Illustrating fungi part 2

Painting fungi with gouache. Part 1

Painting fungi with gouache. Part 2

Equipment needed for painting fungi

Sketching in the field

Backgrounds for paintings

Pen and ink with watercolour

These are the formal references for the articles available in this section:

Minton, L. (1989). Illustrating fungi. 1. Mycologist 3: 114-115

Minton, L. (1989). Illustrating fungi. 2. Mycologist 3: 181-182

Minton, L. (1990). Illustrating fungi. 3. Painting fungi with gouache. Part 1. Mycologist 4: 14-15

Minton, L. (1990). Illustrating fungi. 4. Painting fungi with gouache. Part 2. Mycologist 4: 74-75

Minton, L. (1990). Illustrating fungi. 5. Equipment needed for painting fungi. Mycologist 4: 138-139

Minton, L. (1990). Illustrating fungi. 6. Sketching in the field. Mycologist 4: 182-183

Minton, L. (1991). Illustrating fungi. 7. Backgrounds for paintings. Mycologist 5: 38-39

Minton, L. (1991). Illustrating fungi. 8. Pen and ink with watercolour. Mycologist 5: 90-91

Lorna Minton is a Gold-medal-winning botanical artist. CLICK HERE to visit her own website to learn more.

 


Gordon Dickson's series of articles deals with the basics of good photography. We have also added some other, later, articles that expand the photographic theme.

Intentions, aims and viewpoints

Camera, lights, action!

Composition and exposure

Some examples in colour

Problems with colours

Studio photography

Photomicrography

Photography through the microscope for absolute beginners

Choosing and using equipment

These are the formal references for the articles available in this section:

Dickson, G. (1987). Photographing fungi. 1. Mycologist 1: 76-77

Dickson, G. (1987). Photographing fungi. 2. Mycologist 1: 124-125

Dickson, G. (1987). Photographing fungi. 3. Mycologist 1: 176-177

Dickson, G. (1988). Photographing fungi. 4. Mycologist 2: 26-28

Dickson, G. (1988). Photographing fungi. 5. Mycologist 2: 71-72

Dickson, G. (1988). Photographing fungi. 6. Mycologist 2: 174-175

Dickson, G. (1989). Photographing fungi. 7. Mycologist 3: 37-38

Braddock, A. (2000). Photography through the microscope. A guide for absolute beginners. Field Mycology 1: 7-8

Dickson, G. (1989). Photographing fungi. 8. Mycologist 3: 84-85

Further articles about photography of fungi are available here as follows:

Smart, R.G., Seviour, R.J. & Pethica, L.M. (1989). A modified camera tripod suitable for photographing fungi at ground level. Mycologist 3: 147-149 CLICK HERE to download the complete text.

And did you know that you can take high quality close-up "photographs" with your flat-bed scanner? Well, here's how:

Evans, S. (1996). Electronic fungi - a virtual possibility. Mycologist 10: 8-10. CLICK HERE to download the complete text.

Greenhalgh, P.M. (2002). Scanopics. Taking photographs with a flat-bed scanner. Field Mycology 3: 6-8. CLICK HERE to download the complete text.

 

The best source of photographic images can be found at http://www.rogersmushrooms.com/ which is based on the most commonly-used field guide (Roger Phillips' Mushrooms and other fungi of Great Britain and Europe) and which aims to become the most complete collection of mushroom photographs ever assembled.

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Fungi for Schools - an integrated  collection of teaching resources British Mycological Society 2006

06/08/2006