Mycology answers

 

 

In her series 'Mycology answers' in the Mycologist between 1993 and 1999, Susan Isaac dealt with a wide range of common questions about fungi. Browse through the questions below and just click your mouse to download the explanation.

 

Why does jam go mouldy, even in the fridge? How are soya beans fermented?
Why does “athlete’s foot” itch?  What are mycotoxins?
How are beer and lager produced? Peanuts, fungal toxins and the health of wild birds.
Is pigmentation an advantage to fungi? Is fungal development influenced by light?
What are fungal cords, strands and rhizomorphs? Are old papers and manuscripts damaged by fungi?
How can fungi improve paper manufacturing? Do airborne fungal spores cause allergies?
How do lichens survive severe drought? What is dimorphism in fungi?
What is autolysis in fungal hyphae? How do fungi obtain iron? 
How do fungi degrade cellulose? How are fungal enzymes used in cheese production?
What are secondary metabolites? What determines dormancy of fungus spores?
What influences germination of fungal spores? What is the role of toxins in plant diseases?
How do fungi contribute to decomposition? How do fungicides work?
How and why do many fungal hyphae form septa? How do fungal cells  differ from other microbes?
How do hyphal tips differ from the rest of the hypha?

 

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Classroom materials may be copied freely for educational purposes only. All rights reserved for commercial use. © British Mycological Society 2006.

 

The complete references for these articles are shown below. Remember you can download the complete text by clicking the hyperlinks in the table above. The reprints are made available this way with the permission of the author.

 

Isaac, S. (1993). Mycology answers. Why does jam go mouldy, even in the fridge? Mycologist 7:198.

Isaac, S. (1993). Mycology answers. Foot rot of people or Why does “athlete’s foot” itch? Mycologist 7: 92-93.

Isaac, S. (1993). Mycology answers. How are beer and lager produced and how do the fermentation processes differ? Mycologist 7: 143.

Isaac, S. (1994). Mycology answers. How are soya beans fermented to make soy sauce and why is it salty? Mycologist 8: 38-39.

Isaac, S. (1994). Mycology answers. What are mycotoxins and how harmful are they? Mycologist 8: 91-92.

Isaac, S. (1994). Mycology answers. Peanuts and the health of wild birds: do fungal toxins cause their demise? Mycologist 8: 135-136.

Isaac, S. (1994). Mycology answers. Many fungi are brightly coloured: does pigmentation provide any advantage to those species? Mycologist 8: 178-179.

Isaac, S. (1995). Mycology answers. Moulds, mildews and other fungi are often found in shaded and dark situations – is their development influenced by light? Mycologist 9: 41-42.

Isaac, S. (1995). Mycology answers. What are fungal cords, strands and rhizomorphs and how are they of benefit to the fungus? Mycologist 9: 90-91.

Isaac, S. (1995). Mycology answers. Old papers, manuscripts and books often develop spots and patches; are these caused by fungi? Mycologist 9: 138-139.

Isaac, S. (1995). Mycology answers. How can fungi make paper manufacturing processes more environmentally-friendly? Mycologist 9: 182-183.

Isaac, S. (1996). Mycology answers. To what extent do airborne fungal spores contribute to respiratory disease and allergic reactions in humans? Mycologist 10: 31-32.

Isaac, S. (1996). Mycology answers. How do lichens survive severe drought conditions? Mycologist 10: 89-90.

Isaac, S. (1996). Mycology answers. What is meant by the term dimorphism as applied to fungi and is it an important phenomenon? Mycologist 10: 134-135.

Isaac, S. (1996). Mycology answers. What are the factors that contribute to the onset of autolysis in fungal hyphae and does the process confer any ecological advantage? Mycologist 10: 158-159.

Isaac, S. (1997). Mycology answers. Iron is relatively insoluble and often unavailable in the natural environment: how do fungi obtain sufficient supplies? Mycologist 11: 41-42.

Isaac, S. (1997). Mycology answers. How do fungi degrade and obtain nutrients from cellulose? Mycologist 11: 92-93.

Isaac, S. (1997). Mycology answers. How are the activities of enzymes from fungi utilised in cheese production? Mycologist 11: 122-123.

Isaac, S. (1997). Mycology answers. Fungi naturally form many diverse biochemical products, some of which are now commercially important; how and why do they do this? Mycologist 11: 182-183.

Isaac, S. (1998). Mycology answers. What factors determine the duration of the dormancy of fungus spores prior to germination? Mycologist 12: 38-39.

Isaac, S. (1998). Mycology answers. What factors influence the germination and outgrowth of fungal spores? Mycologist 12: 91-92.

Isaac, S. (1998). Mycology answers. Some fungi produce toxins that affect the physiological functioning of higher plants: what is the role of these compounds in toxins in the development of plant diseases? 12: 124-125.

Isaac, S. (1998). Mycology answers. To what extent does fungal activity contribute to the processes of decomposition in soils and in composts? Mycologist 12: 185-186.

Isaac, S. (1999). Mycology answers. What is the mode of action of fungicides and how do fungi develop resistance? Mycologist 13: 38-39.

Isaac, S. (1999). Mycology answers. How and why do many fungal hyphae form septa? Mycologist 13: 89-90.

Isaac, S. (1999). Mycology answers. In terms of cell structure and function, how do the fungi differ from other microbes? Mycologist 13: 137-138.

Isaac, S. (1999). Mycology answers. How do hyphal tip regions differ from the main body of the hypha in terms of function and activity? Mycologist 13: 185-186.


 

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06/08/2006